When you’re preparing for a session, the best place to start is with writing out more specific, direct questions. If you haven’t done this yet, please read my article Life Questions and follow the steps to get the most out of your time with me.

Everyone seems to always have questions that are simple yes and no answers, or maybe a multiple choice question.

Once you’ve written out your big questions, then sit down and write out the simple ones.

If time allows, I’ll quickly go over these with you at the end of our time together. When I mention that we only have about five minutes, that’s a good time to break out this list. If you’ve only booked a 25 minute session, we may not have time to review a lot, or any, of these, types of questions but it’s always good to be prepared.

Below are tips in writing the best, most direct, can’t be misconstrued yes or no, A or B questions.

  1. Phrases and words to avoid:

    Try with all your might to stay away from questions with “should” in it. God and Spirit  doesn’t like to tell us we “should” do something because that goes against us having free will.

    So instead of asking, “Should I take a vacation this year?” ask “Would it be in my best interest to take a vacation this year?” 

    Another phrase to stay away from is “is it possible?”. Truly, all things are possible, so those will always and forever be yes answers.

  2. Make sure your questions are precisely yes or no, there’s no chance of a maybe – or being misled by a yes or no answer when the question isn’t complete!

    Instead of asking, “Would it be in my best interest to take a vacation to California or Montana this year?” ask, “Would it be in my best interest to take a vacation to California this year?” or “Would it be in my best interest to take a vacation to Montana this year?”  

  3. Asking A/B Qs. 

    This is for when you really have a choice you want to make between two or three things. If you can whittle it down to two options, that’s the best.

    Instead of asking, “Would it be in my best interest to take a vacation to California or Montana this year?” (or breaking it down in the example above) ask, “Which vacation spot would be in my best interest this year? A. California    B. Montana”

    Another example: “Which car would be better for me to purchase at this time? A. That red 2017 Mustang at (enter dealerships name) in (town). B. The silver 2015 GMC Denali at (enter dealerships name) in (town).”

    See how specific those are? You can’t go wrong with that.  (If you get a no for each of those questions, that just means there’s something better for you – so keep looking!)

    Be sure to read the other two articles in this series of

    Preparing for a Reading:

    Life Questions & Before a Session: Relaxation Tips

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